I’m reading Richard Stearns’ [relatively] new book, “Unfinished.” (It’s published 2013 by Thomas Nelson. But, since we can Google a book title and author these days, do publishers and dates really matter anymore? I guess if there are multiple editions of the same book — and you’re seeking a particular edition? Anyway, I digress.) He begins at a starting point that seems so critical for today’s era: Do we really believe? And does faith matter?

Here’s my theory: It all starts with a clarion call to faith. If we don’t sort out the belief card, nothing else matters. We can’t establish the priority of the Good News. We can’t lay a foundation of absolute truth. We can’t clarify what happens after we die.

Bottom line: If we don’t share a common faith, we’re toast.

The bad news is — we can no longer assume a common faith. Take Britain for instance. As recently as 2001, 71.7% claimed to be Christian in Britain. As of the end of 2011, that number had fallen to 59.3%. By contrast, the overall number of Muslims, taken among all ages, climbed from 3% to 4.8%. True: Much of that rise was due to an influx of foreign born. [See http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20675307 ] But a closer look reveals that among younger populations, the number of Muslims has now climbed to 10%! [http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/10062745/Christianity-declining-50pc-faster-than-thought-as-one-in-10-under-25s-is-a-Muslim.html ]

We could provide THOUSANDS of stats to support this same trend, in so many other lands that were historically Christian. My conclusion: I’m convinced that Stearns’ beginning point must become a starting point for practically everything we do. Please understand: I’m not calling his a crisis of faith. Rather, it’s a CANYON of faith. It’s empty. Void. And we’d better address it.

Your thoughts? Agree? Disagree? Just click in the comment box following the online version of this item at the link below. Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

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